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Full text of "The Flow Of Gases In Furnaces"

F

104           RATIONAL CONSTRUCTION" OF  FURNACES

stove and open to the space below the dome at its upper end.
The volume of the combustion chamber is very large, w Never-
theless, it does not function in a satisfactory manner, because the
streams of flaming gases have a very high temperature and,

FIG. 70.

FIG. 71.

accordingly, a very slight density.    For these reasons, the stream
of flaming gases rises very rapidly, leaves the combustion chamber

(1) Guilow, in an article (Revue de laSociete russe de M&tallurgie, 1911, p. 164)
gives the volume of the different portions of a Cowper hot hlast stove at the
Kouchwa works, and the time the gas remains in these portions, as follows:


	Volume Cubic Meters
	Time, Seconds

Combustion chamber
	14 53
	4 60

Dome of stove
	6 16
	1 77

Checkerwork openings
	42 40
	16 96

Chamber below the eheckerwork .........
	5 14
	5 14


	
	

Totals ...................................
	68 23
	28.47


	
	

Note by translator to English.—It is rather interesting to compare these
volumes with the volumes of hot blast stoves given in a paper by Arthur
J. Boynton, National Tube Co., Lorain, Ohio, before the October, 1916,
meeting of the American Iron and Steel Institute. The Russian furnace
is undoubtedly much smaller than the American furnaces.